How to Achieve That Perfect Thigh Gap

...Throwing light on the facts.

By: Eric Olesen from Fitness Goals

photo via favim.com

photo via favim.com

If you’re someone who has always had big thighs, you would know the importance of a thigh gap.  

A thigh gap is the clear space right under your crotch and in between your middle and upper thighs.  

A small gap within your thighs is an ultimate symbol of a well-toned female body according to most media today.  

It appears that in order to have a minimum thigh gap, your thighs should be totally devoid of fat.  

However, as every woman knows, the inner thighs are outrageously difficult to curb fat and hence for all dieting women, inner thighs remain the Mount Everest of their body.

Debunking a few myths on thigh gaps

The extent to which some girls have gone in order to try and bring that gap in between both thighs has made it an extremely controversial topic.  

This has raised a bunch drama around the thigh gap... so what are the few myths and facts surrounding this topic?

Myth #1: Anyone can easily get a thigh gap like the supermodels

Under optimal situations, the female bone structure and the way in which the femur bone is spread out naturally forms a thigh gap.  

Since every woman is different, there are some who can never ever achieve a slight gap in between their thighs, no matter how much toned and thin their thighs are.

This is simply a matter of bone structure and it is okay if you have a body type that doesn't allow for a thigh gap.  

While the majority of women can obtain a thigh gap with enough dedication, it may not be healthy.  

It requires low body fat percentages that many people cannot maintain.  

And always remember: even if your bone structure doesn't allow the gap, there are still many other benefits to remaining healthy and fit.

Myth #2: You require being skinny like a supermodel to get a thigh gap

The absence or appearance of a gap within thighs is usually due to a layer of fat within your inner thighs.  

The less fat that you have, the more likely you are to have a gap.

This automatically means that the skinnier you are, the easier it will be for you to get that gap in between thighs.  

But again, as every woman is shaped differently, the structure of your body plays a big role in deciding the gap that you can have.

Myth #3: You can’t build leg muscles if you want a gap

Unless you’re working out like a man with heavy weights and doing squats with 225lbs, plus eating enough to put on tons of muscle, it’s pretty unlikely that you will get quads which block the thigh gap.  

Nevertheless, if you still want to do leg exercises with weights to ensure that you have streamlined legs, you have to ensure that you stick to lower weights to create strong, but lean, muscles.

Best exercises to help you get the much-desired thigh gap

Though it is true that losing those extra pounds through a proper schedule of diet and exercise is the best way in which you can get a thigh gap, yet there are 5 exercises which can speed up the long-muscle building process.

1.     Pile squats

2.     Pilates leg lifts

3.     Bridge raises

4.     Inner leg lift

5.     Lateral lunge

Once you keep doing these exercises daily, along with proper diet, you will be able to accomplish your dream of having a gap in between your thighs and feel like a supermodel (assuming, again, that your bone structure allows it).

To know more on this, you can check out www.fitnessgoals.com

Resources:

http://thighgaphack.com/how-to-get-a-thigh-gap/

http://upcominghealth.com/how-to-get-a-thigh-gap/

Photo: https://favim.com/image/2690410/

Glycemic Index: What is it and how can your health benefit from it?

This is a guest post courtesy of Needak Rebounder for Flabs to Fitness.

photo provided by needak rebounder.

photo provided by needak rebounder.

The Glycemic Index is a valuable tool that has become a staple concept within health and fitness circles. When used intelligently and responsibly, the glycemic index can be used as a powerful mechanism for improving health, reducing the risk of certain diseases and reaching healthy weight goals.

What is the Glycemic Index?

The Glycemic Index - commonly referred to as “GI” - is a scale that ranks the way different carbohydrate foods affect your blood glucose (also known as “blood sugar”).  The GI is represented as a number, with the highest value being 100 which is equivalent to pure glucose and corresponds to the effect pure glucose would have on blood glucose levels.  So, if you were to consume a tablespoon of glucose, or sugar, you can imagine the effect it would have on your body: your blood sugar level would rise very fast seeing as glucose does not need to be broken down by your digestive system.  You might feel hyperactive, jittery or a suddenly energetic.  The glucose would cause a very rapid and high rise to your blood glucose level.

The higher the GI of a particular food, the more rapidly it is digested and absorbed by your body and the more dramatically it increases your blood sugar.  Foods that are low GI foods take longer to digest and absorb, which creates a gradual increase to blood sugar

image provided by needak rebounder.

image provided by needak rebounder.

In other words, low GI foods release the energy content of food slowly and steadily over a longer period of time unlike high GI foods, which provide quick-release energy within a shorter time span.

Can low GI diets help with weight loss?

One of the most significant and noticeable effects of low GI foods is their effect on appetite.  Due to their slow digestion, low GI foods last longer in your system and therefore keep you satiated for a greater period of time.  By steadily releasing energy to your body, you feel full for longer and experience hunger pangs less often than on high GI foods.  Therefore, when it comes to weight loss and weight management, the natural hunger-suppressing quality of low GI foods means you can stick to a healthy diet more easily and focus on feeding your body only as much as it needs

Research also shows that low GI foods encourage your body to burn stored fat and assists in lowering cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels. 

What are examples of low GI foods?

Generally, carbohydrate foods are divided into three GI categories:

Low GI: 1 to 55
Medium GI: 56 to 69
High GI: 70 and higher

When we talk about low GI foods, we refer to foods that are within the 1-55 GI range.  Below are some examples of low GI foods – as you will see, there are plenty of different foods that fall within the low GI range.  Creating your own low GI diet is not difficult when you know what to choose from!

Cereals: oat bran; rolled oats; natural muesli; porridge.

Breads: soya and linseed; wholegrain pumpernickel; heavy mixed grain; whole wheat; sourdough rye; sourdough wheat.

Vegetables: frozen green peas; frozen sweet corn; carrots; eggplant/aubergine; broccoli; cauliflower; cabbage; mushrooms; tomatoes; chillies; lettuce; green beans; red peppers; onions; yams; sweet potatoes.

Fruits: cherries; plums; grapefruit; peaches; apples; pears; dried apricots; grapes; coconut; coconut milk; kiwi fruit; oranges; strawberries; prunes.

Legumes (Beans): kidney beans (canned); butter beans; chick peas; haricot/navy beans; red lentils; green lentils; pinto beans; black eyed beans; yellow split peas.

Grains: brown rice; pearl barley; buckwheat; white long grain rice; spaghetti.

Eating low GI foods does not mean you need to forego your tastebuds or flavourful foods.  There are plenty of delicious low GI recipes easily found through Google.  The Glycemic Index Foundation is a good place to start – they provide breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack recipes that all look tantalizing and many of them take less that 20 minutes to whip up! 

photo provided by needak rebounder.

photo provided by needak rebounder.

Are there any benefits to consuming high and medium GI foods?

High/medium GI whole foods such as bananas, pineapples, watermelon and dates are advantageous sources of quick energy for times when your body requires rapid fuel replenishment.  For example, after performing a rigorous workout it’s important to refuel your body so that your muscles can properly recover and rebuild.  In such instances, eating a natural high/medium GI food in order to provide your body some immediate sustenance until your next meal can assist with muscle recovery

Other health benefits of low GI diets:

There is a significant body of clinical research which describe various health benefits of maintaining a low GI diet.  One of the most notable areas of research is the effect low GI diets can have in reducing the risk of diabetes.  High GI diets create unhealthy surges to insulin levels.  If you maintain a high GI diet for long enough, your body develops insulin resistance, which is a precursor to Type 2 Diabetes.  Conversely, low GI foods do not spike your insulin levels and assists your body in maintain proper regulation of insulin and blood glucose levels.  Proper Low GI diets can also help with managing and improving diabetes symptoms by improving blood glucose levels, reducing insulin resistance and improving blood cholesterol levels.

Other benefits of maintaining a low GI diet include being at a lower risk of developing heart disease and age-related adult macular degeneration

Final thoughts:

Given all the evidence supporting the benefits of low GI foods, it makes a great deal of sense to switch to a predominantly low GI diet.  Low GI diets can markedly assist with reaching and maintaining healthy weight and significantly lessen the the risk of developing serious diseases.  Furthermore, combining regular exercise activities with a predominantly low GI diet can maximise weight loss and promote overall well-being.  And you don’t need to overwhelm yourself with strenuous high impact or heavy duty exercises or heavy duty exercise to maintain good health.  There are numerous low impact options such as walking, rebounding, swimming, strength training which you can tailor to fit your individual needs and requirements.

About Needak

Needak Rebounder is an official retailer of the bestselling rebounder in the world.  Their fitness device is focused on alternate forms of in-home cardiovascular health, and their blog features many articles which focus on this and how it relates to the sport of rebounding.  Visit Needak.com if you are interested in exploring the Needak Rebounder and the revolutionary sport of rebounding.

Benefits of Turmeric: How Turmeric Can Transform Your Health

Photo Courtesy of New Falkanz Home Remedies (5)

Photo Courtesy of New Falkanz Home Remedies (5)

Known as the ‘golden spice’ of Southeast Asia, the powerful health benefits of turmeric have recently captured the attention of health enthusiasts and the medical field worldwide.

This yellow ginger, popularly used in curry dishes, contains a healing chemical compound called curcumin. This compound is proven to have anti-inflammatory properties, contain very strong antioxidants, and even have anti-cancer qualities.

Proven Health and Beauty Benefits of Turmeric

Recent studies revealed that the health benefits of using turmeric are far more extensive than what was previously known. Aside from optimizing bodily functions and reversing diseases, turmeric can also improve your mental health and enhance the beauty of your hair and skin.

Anti-inflammatory Properties

Inflammation is an important body reaction in order to fight off bacteria that could easily enter our bodies; however, chronic or long-term inflammation can work against your body and allow bacteria to enter your body’s tissues. The curcumin in turmeric is a very strong anti-inflammatory agent that targets inflammation at a molecular level.

Antioxidant

Oxidative damage is one of the major causes of diseases and rapid aging. Curcumin is a potent antioxidant that helps neutralize free radicals and helps stimulate your body’s own production of antioxidants

Brain Disease Prevention

The Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is an important hormone in your brain that helps with creating new connections between neurons. A decreased level BDNF could lead to brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Curcumin increases the levels of BDNF in the brain and helps fight brain degeneration.

Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Curcumin is found to help optimize the function of endothelium, the lining in the blood vessel that is important for regulation of blood pressure and normal blood clotting.

Cancer Prevention

There are many different types of cancer, but recent studies have shown that the majority of cancers react positively to the properties found in turmeric. Curcumin has been shown to help delay the spread of cancer, prevent tumor growth, and even kill some cancerous cells.

Hair and Skin Benefits

Hair

Turmeric has been used for many years in beauty recipes to help prevent hair loss, stop dandruff, and slow the growth of facial hair.

Skin

Turmeric can be included in many skin improvement recipes to help improve your skin’s elasticity, lighten pigmentation, control oily skin, cure acne, lighten stretch marks, and heal cracked and dry skin.

Photo Courtesy of Healthy Food House (  4)

Photo Courtesy of Healthy Food House (4)

Health Benefits of Turmeric for Weight Loss

Consuming turmeric supplements alone is not a sure guarantee for weight loss. Turmeric supplements should be complemented with proper diet and exercise.

Turmeric, as we learned above, is effective at reducing inflammatory messaging in your body’s cells. This in turn can help improve:

  • Metabolism

  • Management of blood sugar levels

  • Control cholesterol levels

  • Insulin resistance

All of these factors are closely associated with obesity.

How to Take your Turmeric

In order for you to get the full health benefits of turmeric, health experts recommend taking it with black pepper. The combination enhances the body’s absorption of the curcumin in turmeric by 2,000 percent, as published in a 1998 PubMed article in the US National Library of Medicine.

You can buy your turmeric in its original ginger form, in powdered form, or in capsules as a supplement. You can take your turmeric by cooking a lot of curry dishes such as:

  • Chicken Curry

  • Lamb Tagine

  • Mediterranean stew

  • Curried Winter Soup

It can be included in almost any meat and vegetable dish, or you can simply sprinkle it in your fried rice and add fine ground pepper. Others prefer to take it as a supplement in capsule form, but be sure to ingest a few whole peppercorns together with it for maximum benefit.

Special Considerations when Consuming Turmeric during Pregnancy

The health benefits of turmeric are also available for pregnant women. Turmeric is generally safe to be consumed when used as a spice in food, and the mother can still gain its full health benefits.

However, doctors do not advise taking turmeric as a supplement during pregnancy. Excessive intake of turmeric can stimulate the fetus, leading to premature childbirth or miscarriage.


The Key Takeaway: Turmeric can be a Great & Healthy Addition to your Diet

As you have read above, turmeric can have a plethora of health benefits. I suggest you follow the guidelines here for consumption, and consult a doctor if you have special circumstances (i.e. you are pregnant).

If you want to check out new healthy additions that you can make to your daily life, be sure to sign up for the Rebounder Zone newsletter here!

About the Author

photo via rebounderzone.come

photo via rebounderzone.come

Leonard Parker is a health blogger and owner of the eCommerce store, Rebounder Zone.  Through Rebounder Zone, Leonard’s team specializes in rebounder trampolines, health equipment, and useful health information for mature adults.

Leonard is a graduate of Stanford University and has worked in various roles as a digital marketing specialist and technology consultant.  Rebounder Zone was started because  Leonard saw first hand how health living with regular exercise can change lives, and he wants to help others experience this incredible feeling, too.  For any questions about rebounding or information mentioned in this article, please contact Leonard at leonard@rebounderzone.com.

Sources:

1. Ying Xu, et. al. (2006, November 29) Curcumin reduces the effects of chronic stress in behavior, the HPA axis, BDNF expression and phosphorylation of CREB. Retreived from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006899306027144

2. Ravindran J., et. al. (2009 September) Curcumin and Cancer Cells: How Many Ways Can Curry Kill Tumor Cells Selectively? Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2758121/

3. Shoba G, et. al. (1998 May) Influence of piperine on the pharmacokinetics of curcumin in animals and human volunteers. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9619120

4. Turmeric - Spice With Amazing Health Benefits. (2013). Retrieved August 16, 2016, from http://www.healthyfoodhouse.com/turmeric-spice-with-amazing-health-benefits/

5. Home Remedies. (n.d.). Retrieved August 16, 2016, from https://nawfalkanz.blogspot.com/2014/08/benefits-of-turmeric-for-beauty-skin.html

6. K., V. (2015, October 25). 8 Health Benefits of Turmeric. Retrieved August 16, 2016, from http://www.urbanmali.com/8-health-benefits-of-turmeric/